We are honored and proud to host them at our gallery.  

Here are some artists who we have had the privilege of hosting in our gallery through the years.  


ARTIST: ADAM CROWLEY

Artist Statement: Making artwork is, for me, a way of stepping back from the overwhelming aspects of contemporary life. It is way to work through problems, explore ideas, and mull over themes that cannot be expressed verbally. Ethereality, holy objects, and the idea of contemplation are used as jumping off points, while undercurrents of Mid-Westernism, anxiety, longing and the balance of order and chaos in our environment flow through the work. Everyday life creeps in, and is used with the same respect as more esoteric thoughts and ideas. Through all of this, I am trying to answer questions that can’t be written down.

I draw ideas from monasticism, penance, and asceticism. I also work on the impressions I draw from contemporary life, the absence of restraint, and questions directed toward the downfall of holy places, devotion to higher sources, what the void of these once revered parts of our lives looks like. I use early renaissance geometry to divide the canvas, giving order to the picture plane. I then subvert that order by manipulating the image, or lack there-of, using various techniques both culled from art history and from my own experimentation. Utilizing and examining these now archaic ideals that once held such high esteem allows me to pause and ponder the aspects of life now deemed unnecessary.

Overall, I want a certain quietude to exude from my work. Whether it be uneasy quietness, or serenity, or anxious waiting, or the aftermath of some cataclysm, I’m always looking for a sense of pause, like the moment when the words are right on the tip of one’s tongue, and everyone is waiting expectantly. If my work can give pause to someone, and draw them in quietly and allow them a space for contemplation, I have succeeded.


ARTIST: Mental Wanderings – the Abstract Work of Lance Pufahl

Statement: Lance Pufahl is an artist and graphic designer based in downtown Kansas City.  His artistic interests lie in the idea of taking simple subject matters or ideas and making them interesting and dynamic to the viewer. 

He is constantly exploring different mediums and new surfaces to utilize with his art, but his most common works tend to be acrylic on canvas.  His styles have varied over the years, ranging from modern or pop art, to fine art, to abstract art.


ARTIST: Top high school age artists from Whitefield Academy

Statement: Beggars Table Church + Gallery will host the top high school age artists from Whitefield Academy. As a celebration of student achievements, Beggars Table affirms the value of art at all age levels.


ARTIST:  ERIC Tiffany

Statement: Eric Tiffany is a portrait painter from Kansas City. His recent work includes a series of paintings of panhandlers and buskers he has encountered on the street.

Eric has teamed up with Kansas City Rescue Mission, painting portraits of the men and women enrolled in its resident recovery programs and the homeless waiting to check into the mission for a meal and a bed.

During this process, Eric has learned something about the human condition and the hope that every person needs. The title of his show, Inhabitants, represents those who dwell among us and what we all have in common.

A portion of proceeds from sales will be donated to Kansas City Rescue Mission.


ARTIST:  KELLY KRUSE

Statement: This body of work includes seventeen abstract paintings that are illuminations of the multi-movement Ein Deutsches Requiem by Johannes Brahms. Composed in 1868, the Brahms Requiem was the first work of its kind in German, breaking the mold of previous requiem masses. What makes the Brahms Requiem unique is the absence of traditional, nonbiblical Latin texts and the use, instead, of texts from the Luther Bible. Brahms deliberately chose and edited his texts so the work never makes direct mention of Jesus, which became a point of contention for many people when it premiered. Brahms composed during the Romantic era, firmly situated in a post-enlightenment world, and he could be quite ambiguous and even evasive when discussing his religious beliefs. Some historians believe he was an agnostic, and therefore the Brahms Requiem, though set to Christian texts, has often been viewed as a humanist rather than Christian work. My inspiration came from the work as a whole, including its context in Brahms' life, the musical structures, the biblical texts, and my visceral reactions to the music itself. The work explores many themes that I hope those who view the exhibition will have a chance to engage, particularly the inevitability of death and human life's fleeting nature. Meditation on this solemn theme is practiced in the Christian church across denominations all over the world during the forty day Lenten season. Beyond the solemnity of the season, the Brahms Requiem reveals glimmers of hope amid suffering, the promise of comfort in sorrow, adoration of God and meditation on his promises, and finally, the powerful reality of a God who would enter into the world to conquer death, one of the few things that man, in all his finite glory, is unable to conquer.⠀


ARTIST:  Leigh Ford

Statement: Painting and drawing has long been another vehicle for people to communicate with the world around them, the world inside of themselves, thoughts, feelings, perceptions, reactions, hopes, dreams, disillusionments, anguish, really, whatever is available to the human experience. Art is the abstract vehicle to research and analyze these things like no other thing can.

In this light, art is in the least complex, and at most beautiful, however not beautiful in the traditional concept of beauty. Beautiful, in that it can move a person to become enlightened and connected, like being asleep, and then one wakes up! It is beautiful to become awake to something
new. In fact real change only occurs when a persons perceptions and thoughts change.  I would say that art is essential to this kind of substantial
change. And change is crucial no matter who the person is, or well educated they are, or spiritually sound they may be, everyone is in need of some kind of change.

My art takes into consideration these complexities of human nature, as well as the complexities of the world around me. I try to reveal through
analysis of imagery, color, mark making, distortion, content and placement. the ultimate question, "what is this all about"? I am very inspired by the open and direct art making of children, who rarely asks anything about the meaning of their art, and yet their hand to paper experience can nonetheless be very revealing. I am also inspired by artists who diligently try to capture any and all complexities in their work.

I hope to make something that will at least inspire the question "why"?, and perhaps create some confusion of what others think they already have
figured out.  I hope some good positive confusion will inspire others and myself to question deeper, their own perceptions of the world around them, in this way we all have an opportunity for change.

Positive change ultimately takes center stage when the human being is willing to experience pain, and sometimes a significant amount of pain, by
experiencing pain humans become more willing to seek God. I try not to leave no stone unturned when I begin to create a painting. I want to reveal the potential of human suffering, as well as the newfound hope of making it to the other side. By distortion and placement of a variety of objects and ideas, I want to ignite the common thread of human suffering, and by color and drawing, and mark making I want to make that journey exciting, as exciting as it has been for me! I want to engage the viewer and myself, not by common knowledge or experience, but by understanding and empathy. Perhaps, by this stretch of openness, it will ignite a passion that often falls into lethargy when it comes to change.  Things need to change, this is what I believe is the heart of my work.


ARTIST: Carlos M. Ortiz

Statement: The prints that are being produced as part of my latest body of work deal with concepts of memory and nostalgia, loss, and separation, overlapped with visual elements of cultural and social appropriation, that otherwise illustrate two phases of my existence. The prints mirror family photographs that are being reworked through collage and drawing elements. The prints often depict a “missing figure”, symbolizing a turning point in my life. The use of collage in the photographs implies the fragmented, torn, and “pieced-together” lifestyle that I confronted. However, collage also works as a means to create a visual vocabulary of the different elements of everyday life the I tore from, to cope and replace the absence of an important family figure.

Much of these elements include products, personalities, and everyday activities that were thus foreign to me. The prints also hope to develop different components and begin to move away from the depiction of the “missing figure”. The body of work also schemes to bring focus the shift of culture that I experienced, from my hometown in Lima, Peru to my new life in Miami, by working with photographs that were taken stateside. This resolution, as well, plans to shift focus to different family members and their experience caused by this rift.


Artist: Crystal Neubauer

Statement: Crystal Neubauer is a Mixed Media Artist drawn to the broken, cast out, and overlooked items of the past. She sees beauty in the mundane, brings new life to forgotten objects, and finds the process of salvaging old materials and creating new art to be therapeutic and healing. As her work evolves, a more complete understanding of why she does what she does and chooses to use materials that others see as trash comes to light: 

It's about seeing something beautiful in the discarded

About giving new life to what has been broken and cast out

It's about seeing worth in what has been deemed worthless

And value in the valueless

Ultimately it's about humanity

And redemption

And love


ARTIST: Bret Gottschall

Statement:  “Fake Accidents”

As an artist, I am an observer of life and all things within my field of vision.  These “things” encompass both natural and manmade objects that we encounter every day.  My eye has always been drawn to beauty.  A beauty that is somehow universal or unquestionable, and it is that beauty that I seek when my eyes are open. 

In these new works (these abstract images that I call “fake accidents”), I am creating an opportunity for beauty to find its way into my vision.  Through a process of gluing various paper materials to boards in a random way, and then peeling them apart, I create a new and unknown image with the paper that tears off and sticks to the board it was glued to.  These are “surprise” images that may or may not hold beauty within them.  They are chance images that are occasionally filled with a natural and unexpected beauty that was created by my hand but given birth largely by chance.  Like playing a slot machine, I lose a lot, but if I play long enough, I’m going to win a few.  These are my winners, by beauties, my “fake accidentals.”

Bret Gottschall

Image maker


ARTIST: Jaime Rovenstine

Statement: My work is an exploration of a candy-colored, abstract dream-world, inspired by natural organisms, and informed by an intuitive sense of color and space. Filled with geometric structures, masses of dots, and washes of paint, I view the elements in my work as living organisms, painted inhabitants, pulsing and moving throughout multiple picture planes. Some paintings provide a cosmic view into this imagined world, whereas others present a microscopic perspective–zooming in to show fictitious atomic activity.

As my paintings examine a constructed cosmos, I too examine the artist’s role in the ongoing formation of the world and the innate human desire to contribute creative energy to a universal continuum.


Past Artists